The Weaver's Way

The Weaver's Way is one of the most varied and wonderful long distance trails I know in Norfolk. 

Covering 61 miles of differing Norfolk landscape, this is a walk that lets you explore so many different interests:

  • 15th and 17th century stately homes as well as having the chance to amble through the parklands of these estates
  • Appreciate some beautiful round tower church interiors and other churches and ruins
  • Walk along wonderfully straight but disused railway lines and platforms
  • Walk amongst some of the largest expanses of reedbeds in England and some of the largest areas of open water and grazing marshes in Norfolk
Weavers Way walking trail
  • Follow the Rivers Thurne, Bure and Yare to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth
  • Admire some of the remarkable windmills and drainage mills along the trail
  • Bypass one of the remotest railway stations in the UK (blink and you’ll miss it!)
  • Enjoy some of the incredible panoramic views with windmills, livestock and wildlife all around you
Weavers Way grazing land towards Thurne

This is a walk that is unique to Norfolk Walking Holidays (as is the Wherryman's Way) and one which I can organise for you.  It's a walk that not many people will have done, a great chance to share your memories with other fellow walkers!

You’ll find the various walking options below.

The Weaver's Way Map

This fantastic and fascinating trail starts in the Victorian seaside town of Cromer and winds its way through the most varying Norfolk landscape you can imagine, to finish in another Norfolk seaside town, Gt Yarmouth.

Weavers Way Map

From the start, you’ll never have a dull moment, there’s always something of interest to see.   It’s also nice and flat!

Part ruin of Tunstall Church

Five minutes into the walk you’ll find yourself walking past a rather imposing Gothic building called Cromer Hall.  Then you’ll find yourself in the grounds of the National Trust property of Felbrigg Hall with a beautiful lake.

Tall church towers peek out on the landscape all around you and round tower churches appear out of nowhere.  

Another National Trust stately home, Blickling Hall, beckons you, and then you have a lovely long stretch of trail which takes you along a wooded and disused railway line.

Then the scenery dramatically changes and you enter the Norfolk Broads landscape; churches become replaced with windmills which become ever more prominent.  

Berney Arms windmillBerney Arms Windmill

Following the Rivers Thurne and Bure, you’ll be surrounded by drainage mills as you criss-cross dykes and grazing meadows to finally arrive at the estuary in Gt Yarmouth. 

Why not read a little bit more about what you’ll experience on this Weaver's Way walk here.

Norfolk Broads river and reeds

Weaver's Way options 

There are 5 options for this walk with differing mileages.  Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have about any of these options.  Due to the remoteness of the Broads, it’s a little difficult to alter the mileage.

  • The Weavers Way trail starts at Cromer and meanders its way through very varied Norfolk landscapes to finish at Great Yarmouth.

    Distance: 61 miles/98 km from Cromer to Gt Yarmouth
    Graded: easy
    Taken from: April and October

    This fantastic Weavers Way trail is one of the most varied Norfolk walks. You’ll come across stately homes and their spectacular grounds, disused track beds and platforms, reedbeds and water meadows, round tower churches, windmills and drainage mills and pretty staithes to name just a few points of interest!

    Prices:
    Weavers Way - 5 nights/4 days walking – from £500 per person (based on 2 sharing)
    Weavers Way - 6 nights/5 days walking (2 options) – from £570 per person (based on 2 sharing)
    Weavers Way - 7 nights/6 days walking* – from £660 per person (based on 2 sharing)
    Weavers Way - 8 nights/7 days walking* – from £735 per person (based on 2 sharing)

    * Requires taxi transfers

  • Prices for the Weavers Way walking holidays are based on 2 people sharing a room. If you are a solo walker or would like a single room, an additional single supplement of approx. £40 per person per night will apply.

    Trail Code: WeW1
    Trail length: 61 miles/98 km
    Trail duration:5 nights/4 days walking
    Prices from: £500 per person (based on 2 people sharing)

    4 day suggested walking itinerary

    The itineraries can always be altered to suit your needs, although with this particular walk it’s a little tricky to alter mileage due to the nature of the Broads with their huge expanse of water and rivers whereby you can’t just stop and hope you can find accommodation or transport!

    Arrival
    Arrive and stay the night in Cromer.

    Day 1
    Walk from Cromer to Aylsham (16 miles/25.7 km)

    Starting from Cromer, the path takes you inland to the National Trust grounds and Jacobean property of Felbrigg Hall. Away from the estate, the wooded rolling countryside throws up two round tower churches, two large commons, one enclosed by cattle grids, the other a conservation area, and an extremely pretty Georgian village. Churches sprout up all around you on the horizon and eventually you are led to the second National Trust grounds and property of Blickling Hall. This is another stunning stately home. Following on from here, you reach the first stretch of the disused railway which brings you to the north side of Aylsham.

    Day 2
    Walk from Aylsham to Hickling (17.5 miles/28 km)

    Starting off on the quiet lanes and tracks, you rejoin the disused railway line all the way to North Walsham, passing an old platform and station building. Evident badger activity can be seen along here! Expect to be pleasantly surprised by another old railway platform and station building (boarded up!). You walk right through the middle of North Walsham today, along quiet country lanes and small hamlets and villages to then rejoin the railway again and come across another platform along with the foundations of the station buildings and signal box. The path is scattered with old style railway crossing gates. You’ll skirt the only canal in Norfolk and pass one of the tallest surviving windmills in England today.

    Day 3
    Walk from Hickling to Acle (14.5 miles/23 km)

    The landscape changes dramatically today to become the iconic Norfolk Broads scenery. Staithes, windmills and drainage mills are the order of the day. There are some lovely photo opportunities with the windmills today, particular the white windmill at Thurne. You’ll follow the River Thurne and River Bure very closely. You walk alongside Potter Heigham, a very busy boating town with lots of activity on the waters edge and over the medieval bridge dating back to 1385. Continuing to follow the river and alongside the grazing marshes and reedbeds, you end the day in Acle.

    Day 4
    Walk from Acle to Gt Yarmouth (13 miles/21 km)

    The panoramic views with the windmills and drainage mills are the main attraction today. Navigating a few fields and quite lanes, coming across a church which is part ruin and a couple of small villages brings you to the grazing meadows and water meadows of Halvergate Marshes which is the largest expanse of grazing marsh in East Anglia. This is so peaceful and totally remote. You then follow the River Yare all the way to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth.

    Book Your 4 Day Walk Here

  • Prices for the Weavers Way walking holidays are based on 2 people sharing a room. If you are a solo walker or would like a single room, an additional single supplement of approx. £40 per person per night will apply.

    Trail Code: WeW2
    Trail length: 61 miles/98 km
    Trail duration: 6 nights, 5 days walking – OPTION 1
    Prices from: £570 per person (based on 2 people sharing)

    5 day Option 1 suggested walking itinerary

    The itineraries can always be altered to suit your needs, although with this particular walk it’s a little tricky to alter mileage due to the nature of the Broads with their huge expanse of water and rivers whereby you can’t just stop and hope you can find accommodation or transport!

    Arrival
    Arrive and stay the night in Cromer.

    Day 1
    Walk from Cromer to Erpingham (12.8 miles/20 km – this includes a 25 min walk/1.3 miles to the accommodation at the end of the day)

    Starting from Cromer, the path takes you inland to the National Trust grounds and the Jacobean property of Felbrigg Hall. Away from the estate, the wooded rolling countryside throws up two round tower churches, two large commons, one enclosed by cattle grids, the other a conservation area, and an extremely pretty Georgian village. Your accommodation is a 25 min walk from the middle of the village.

    Day 2
    Walk from Erpingham to North Walsham (13.8 miles/19 km – this includes the 1.3 miles back to the start of the walk)

    Today churches sprout up all around you on the horizon and you soon arrive at the second National Trust grounds and property of Blickling Hall. This is another stunning stately home. Following on from here, you reach the first stretch of the disused railway bringing you to the north side of Aylsham. Quiet lanes and tracks lead you to rejoin the disused railway line all the way to North Walsham, passing an old platform and station building. Evident badger activity can be seen along here! You walk right through the middle of North Walsham and out of the other side to reach your accommodation.

    Day 3
    Walk from North Walsham to Hickling (10 miles/16 km)

    You’ll enjoy the peace and woodlands along another stretch of disused railway line. Expect to be pleasantly surprised by another old railway platform and station building (boarded up!). The path is scattered with old style railway crossing gates. You’ll skirt the only canal in Norfolk and pass one of the tallest surviving windmills in England today.

    Day 4
    Walk from Hickling to Acle (14.5 miles/23 km)

    The landscape changes dramatically today to become the iconic Norfolk Broads scenery. Staithes, windmills and drainage mills are the order of the day. There are some lovely photo opportunities with the windmills today, particular the white windmill at Thurne. You’ll follow the River Thurne and River Bure very closely. You walk alongside Potter Heigham, a very busy boating town with lots of activity on the waters edge and over the medieval bridge dating back to 1385. Continuing to follow the river and alongside the grazing marshes and reedbeds, you end the day in Acle.

    Day 5
    Walk from Acle to Gt Yarmouth (13 miles/21 km)

    The panoramic views with the windmills and drainage mills are the main attraction today. Navigating a few fields and quite lanes, coming across a church which is part ruin and a couple of small villages brings you to the grazing meadows and water meadows of Halvergate Marshes which is the largest expanse of grazing marsh in East Anglia. This is so peaceful and totally remote. You then follow the River Yare all the way to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth.

    Book Your 5 Day Option 1 Walk Here

  • Prices for the Weavers Way walking holidays are based on 2 people sharing a room. If you are a solo walker or would like a single room, an additional single supplement of approx. £40 per person per night will apply.

    Trail Code: WeW3
    Trail length: 61 miles/98 km
    Trail duration: 6 nights, 5 days walking – OPTION 2
    Prices from: £570 per person (based on 2 people sharing)

    5 day Option 2 suggested walking itinerary

    The itineraries can always be altered to suit your needs, although with this particular walk it’s a little tricky to alter mileage due to the nature of the Broads with their huge expanse of water and rivers whereby you can’t just stop and hope you can find accommodation or transport!

    Arrival
    Arrive and stay the night in Cromer.

    Day 1
    Walk from Cromer to Blickling (14.5 miles/23 km)

    Starting from Cromer, the path takes you inland to the National Trust grounds and Jacobean property of Felbrigg Hall. Away from the estate, the wooded rolling countryside throws up two round tower churches, two large commons, one enclosed by cattle grids, the other a conservation area, and an extremely pretty Georgian village. Churches sprout up all around you on the horizon and eventually you are led to the second National Trust grounds and property of Blickling Hall. This is another stunning stately home.

    Day 2
    Walk from Blicking to North Walsham (9.5 miles/15 km)

    Following on from Blickling Hall you reach the first stretch of the disused railway bringing you to the north side of Aylsham. Quiet lanes and tracks lead you to rejoin the disused railway line all the way to North Walsham, passing an old platform and station building. Evident badger activity can be seen along here! You walk right through the middle of North Walsham and out of the other side to reach your accommodation.

    Day 3 Walk from North Walsham to Hickling (10 miles/16 km)

    You’ll enjoy the peace and woodlands along another stretch of disused railway line. Expect to be pleasantly surprised by another old railway platform and station building (boarded up!). The path is scattered with old style railway crossing gates. You’ll skirt the only canal in Norfolk and pass one of the tallest surviving windmills in England today.

    Day 4
    Walk from Hickling to Acle (14.5 miles/23 km)

    The landscape changes dramatically today to become the iconic Norfolk Broads scenery. Staithes, windmills and drainage mills are the order of the day. There are some lovely photo opportunities with the windmills today, particular the white windmill at Thurne. You’ll follow the River Thurne and River Bure very closely. You walk alongside Potter Heigham, a very busy boating town with lots of activity on the waters edge and over the medieval bridge dating back to 1385. Continuing to follow the river and alongside the grazing marshes and reedbeds, you end the day in Acle.

    Day 5
    Walk from Acle to Gt Yarmouth (13 miles/21 km)

    The panoramic views with the windmills and drainage mills are the main attraction today. Navigating a few fields and quite lanes, coming across a church which is part ruin and a couple of small villages brings you to the grazing meadows and water meadows of Halvergate Marshes which is the largest expanse of grazing marsh in East Anglia. This is so peaceful and totally remote. You then follow the River Yare all the way to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth.

    Book Your 5 Day Option 2 Walk Here

  • Prices for the Weavers Way walking holidays are based on 2 people sharing a room. If you are a solo walker or would like a single room, an additional single supplement of approx. £40 per person per night will apply.

    Trail Code: WeW4
    Trail length: 61 miles/98 km
    Trail duration: 7 nights, 6 days walking
    Prices from: £660 per person* (based on 2 people sharing)
    *This walk requires a taxi transfer

    6 day suggested walking itinerary

    The itineraries can always be altered to suit your needs, although with this particular walk it’s a little tricky to alter mileage due to the nature of the Broads with their huge expanse of water and rivers whereby you can’t just stop and hope you can find accommodation or transport! This option does require a taxi transfer.

    Arrival
    Arrive and stay the night in Cromer.

    Day 1
    Walk from Cromer to Erpingham (12.8 miles/20 km – this includes a 25 min walk/1.3 miles to the accommodation at the end of the day)

    Starting from Cromer, the path takes you inland to the National Trust grounds and the Jacobean property of Felbrigg Hall. Away from the estate, the wooded rolling countryside throws up two round tower churches, two large commons, one enclosed by cattle grids, the other a conservation area, and an extremely pretty Georgian village.

    Day 2
    Walk from Erpingham to North Walsham (13.8 miles/19 km – this includes the 1.3 miles back to the start of the walk)

    Today churches sprout up all around you on the horizon and you soon arrive at the second National Trust grounds and property of Blickling Hall. This is another stunning stately home. Following on from here, you reach the first stretch of the disused railway bringing you to the north side of Aylsham. Quiet lanes and tracks lead you to rejoin the disused railway line all the way to North Walsham, passing an old platform and station building. Evident badger activity can be seen along here! You walk right through the middle of North Walsham and out of the other side to reach your accommodation.

    Day 3
    Walk from North Walsham to Stalham (8 miles/12.5 km)

    You’ll enjoy the peace and woodlands along another stretch of disused railway line. Expect to be pleasantly surprised by another old railway platform and station building (boarded up!). The path is scattered with old style railway crossing gates. You’ll skirt the only canal in Norfolk .

    Day 4
    Walk from Stalham to Potter Heigham (10 miles/16 km)

    Today you’ll pass one of the tallest surviving windmills in England. The landscape changes dramatically to become the iconic Norfolk Broads scenery. Drainage mills, Hickling Broad and walking alongside the river until you reach the busy town of Potter Heigham with its medieval bridge dating back to 1385. At the end of the walk you are transferred to your accommodation.

    Day 5
    Walk from Potter Heigham to Acle (7 miles/11 km)

    A shorter walk today but staithes, windmills and drainage mills are the order of the day. There are some lovely photo opportunities with the windmills, particular the white windmill at Thurne. You’ll follow the River Thurne and River Bure very closely. Continuing to follow the river and alongside the grazing marshes and reedbeds, you end the day in Acle.

    Day 6
    Walk from Acle to Gt Yarmouth (13 miles/21 km)

    The panoramic views with the windmills and drainage mills are the main attraction today. Navigating a few fields and quite lanes, coming across a church which is part ruin and a couple of small villages brings you to the grazing meadows and water meadows of Halvergate Marshes which is the largest expanse of grazing marsh in East Anglia. This is so peaceful and totally remote. You then follow the River Yare all the way to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth.


    Book Your 6 Day Walk Here

  • Prices for the Weavers Way walking holidays are based on 2 people sharing a room. If you are a solo walker or would like a single room, an additional single supplement of approx. £40 per person per night will apply.

    Trail Code: WeW5
    Trail length: 61 miles/98 km
    Trail duration: 8 nights, 7 days walking
    Prices from: £735 per person* (based on 2 people sharing)
    *This walk requires taxi transfers

    7 day suggested walking itinerary

    The itineraries can always be altered to suit your needs, although with this particular walk it’s a little tricky to alter mileage due to the nature of the Broads with their huge expanse of water and rivers whereby you can’t just stop and hope you can find accommodation or transport! This option requires two lots of taxi transfers.

    Arrival
    Arrive and stay the night in Cromer.

    Day 1
    Walk from Cromer to Aldborough (8.5 miles/13.5 km)

    Starting from Cromer, the path takes you inland to the National Trust grounds and the Jacobean property of Felbrigg Hall. Walking away from the estate you emerge into the wooded rolling countryside, passing one round tower church, one large common enclosed by cattle grids and arrive at the extremely pretty Georgian village of Aldborough. At the end of the walk you will be transferred to your accommodation approximately 10 mins away.

    Day 2
    Walk from Aldborough to Aylsham (8 miles/12.8 km)

    Today churches sprout up all around you on the horizon and you soon arrive at the second National Trust grounds and property of Blickling Hall. This is another stunning stately home. Following on from here, you reach the first stretch of the disused railway bringing you to the north side of Aylsham.

    Day 3
    Walk from Aylsham to North Walsham (7 miles/11 km)

    Quiet lanes and tracks lead you to rejoin the disused railway line all the way to North Walsham, passing an old platform and station building. Evident badger activity can be seen along here! You walk right through the middle of North Walsham and out of the other side to reach your accommodation.

    Day 4
    Walk from North Walsham to Stalham (8 miles/12.5 km)

    You’ll enjoy the peace and woodlands along another stretch of disused railway line. Expect to be pleasantly surprised by another old railway platform and station building (boarded up!). The path is scattered with old style railway crossing gates. You’ll skirt the only canal in Norfolk .

    Day 5
    Walk from Stalham to Potter Heigham (10 miles/16 km)

    Today you’ll pass one of the tallest surviving windmills in England. The landscape changes dramatically to become the iconic Norfolk Broads scenery. Drainage mills, Hickling Broad and walking alongside the river until you reach the busy town of Potter Heigham with its medieval bridge dating back to 1385. At the end of the walk you are transferred to your accommodation.

    Day 6
    Walk from Potter Heigham to Acle (7 miles/11 km)

    A shorter walk today but staithes, windmills and drainage mills are the order of the day. There are some lovely photo opportunities with the windmills, particular the white windmill at Thurne. You’ll follow the River Thurne and River Bure very closely. Continuing to follow the river and alongside the grazing marshes and reedbeds, you end the day in Acle.

    Day 7
    Walk from Acle to Gt Yarmouth (13 miles/21 km)

    The panoramic views with the windmills and drainage mills are the main attraction today. Navigating a few fields and quite lanes, coming across a church which is part ruin and a couple of small villages brings you to the grazing meadows and water meadows of Halvergate Marshes which is the largest expanse of grazing marsh in East Anglia. This is so peaceful and totally remote. You then follow the River Yare all the way to the estuary at Gt Yarmouth.


    Book Your 7 Day Walk Here

  • Accommodation along the Weavers Way is scarce, but I have a few options. A few require a taxi transfer due to scarcity, or because travel is difficult around the Broads and the rivers. You might have to have flexible dates in order to fit in with the availability of the accommodation, especially during the summer months. There is a mixture between pubs and B&B’s, it just depends which areas have which type available.

  • Included:
    Bed and breakfast accommodation in personally chosen B&B’s, pubs or hotels where all the owners have been met by us, and the accommodation has been vetted by us personally. We have taken the time to make sure you will be very happy with each and every night’s stay.
    Baggage transfer from each night’s accommodation.
    A detailed information pack with OS maps, itinerary with places of interest and places for possible lunches, as well as directions to the accommodation with the name and phone number of the owners where appropriate.
    Emergency telephone support for us in the event of a problem.

    Excluded:
    Lunches, dinners, snacks and drinks.
    Travel Insurance – please make sure you have travel insurance to cover this holiday.
    Transport for any rest days. We will be happy to book you taxis should you require.
    Travel to/from Cromer and to/from Great Yarmouth.
    Rest days -any costs for rest days or extra activities undertaken.

    Extras:
    Additional nights used other than on the Weaver's Way walk itinerary (e.g. rest days, any additional days at the beginning or end of the walk for your own personal holiday not covered by the itinerary).
    Rest days - suggest you add on approximately £60 per person per night.
    Solo walker and single walker supplements - please add on approximately £40 per night to cover the cost of single occupancy, maps for one, and baggage transfers for one

  • All details about how to arrive at your B&B or pub will be in the information pack that is sent out to you prior to your walk, whether you are arriving by car or public transport.

    Arrival:

    By Road:
    Cromer is located on the North Norfolk Coast approximately 45 minutes north of Norwich on the A140/A149.

    Car parking:
    Parking can be tricky in Cromer, but if you are booked into the B&B there will usually be parking in the street for the duration of your walk.

    By Rail:
    To/from Cromer: Cromer railway station (Abellio Greater Anglia network). Trains run to and from Norwich. To reach London you would need to change at Norwich for onward travel.
    From Gt Yarmouth: Gt Yarmouth station ((Abellio Greater Anglia network). Trains run to Norwich and from there you change trains to go to Cromer.

    By Bus:
    The National Express coaches go from London Victoria to Norwich, sometimes with one change at Stansted Airport. You would then need to catch the train to Cromer.

    By Air:
    The nearest airport is London Stansted Airport.

  • If you would like to take an extra day or two as a rest day, please just let me know when you book. You may like to take a rest day to enable you to spend the day at Blickling Hall. We can chat about ideas. As I live in Norfolk, I have a good idea of what there is to see and whether it’s worth visiting! It’s also a great way to see a little extra other than the walking trail!


    Please just ask me and we can chat about it.


Weaver’s Way Distances

The Weaver’s Way is a 61 mile long distance walk starting on the North Norfolk coast in Cromer and finishing on the east coast of Norfolk at Gt Yarmouth.

Weavers Way signs

Like all of our long distance trails that we organise for you, this is an official Norfolk Trail so it’s well sign posted all the way, even through the remotest of grazing meadows towards the end of the walk!

What you’ll see on the Weaver's Way

Stately Homes

There are two very impressive stately homes along this trail, both are completely different.  Felbrigg Hall has a Jacobean exterior, and although Blickling Hall was built on the original foundations, the present building dates back to the 1600’s.

Felbrigg HallFelbrigg Hall

Both are managed by the National Trust, and this particular walk cuts through the beautiful grounds of both properties.  They appear at quite convenient stopping points for either having a bite to eat or just to rest your legs for a little bit. 

If you’d like to take a rest day so that you can visit Blickling Hall for a day, we can discuss this at the time of booking.

If you enjoy walking around formal gardens, then Felbrigg Hall has an amazing walled garden, and Blickling Hall also has a wonderfully structured formal garden at the back of the house.  Both have orangeries and lakes!

Blickling HallBlickling Hall

Disused railway lines and platforms

There are some wonderful long stretches of disused railway tracks which are extremely  pleasant, peaceful and enjoyable.

Back in the day, this railway line was called The Midland and Great Northern Railway and  linked the Midlands to the coast and Gt Yarmouth.  At one point there were over 80 trains running along here at weekends taking factory workers from the Midlands to the seaside for their holiday breaks.  Along with many railway lines in the UK, this one was closed in 1959.

The wooded disused railway line
Replica railway crossing gates

Much of the track bed is enclosed by peaceful wooded landscape or is on high embankments, and you’ll discover two of the platforms which are still intact.

It’s quite a weird sensation arriving at a deserted railway platform!   

One station has the foundations of the signal box and the waiting room whilst the other has the old station building which is boarded up.  Badger activity is also very evident along some of these stretches with huge holes along some of the embankments!

Replica railway crossing gates are a reminder that you’re walking down an old railway line (if you need a reminder!) and are used as a way of alerting you to the quiet lanes you’ll need to cross. 

Round Tower churches and other churches

Thwaite round tower churchThwaite round tower church

What you'll really notice on the first half of the walk are the large number of churches that you come across and how prominent they are on the landscape.  It had me thinking about how important churches were in society (to some they still are, but I think certainly not as much these days).  At one point, as I had a panoramic view in the rolling countryside, I could see three all around me.

Two of Norfolk’s 124 round tower churches are on the Weaver's Way trail too.  Both are fairly early on and are definitely worth popping into.  They are so wonderfully small.

The first is in Sustead which has an amazing roof and the other one, Thwaite round tower church, has beautifully painted organ pipes.

Sustead church ceiling
Thwaite church decorated organ pipes

Villages and towns

Aldborough village sign

Some of the villages that you amble through are peaceful, quiet villages.   

Aldborough has a picturesque green surrounded by Georgian properties (and you’ll come across a few very elegant Georgian properties around Aylsham and North Walsham), whilst Worstead is an unassuming village with an historic Baptist church, old fashioned alms houses and again, some pretty Georgian houses.   However, this village plays an important part in Norfolk’s history.  This is where the high quality Worstead wool originated in the 12th century and is part of the history of the Weavers Way walk.

Market cross, North Walsham

Potter Heigham is a very busy riverside town.  If you stop here at the end of the day you won’t be staying here.  It’s a mecca for Norfolk Broads boating visitors, but it does have a medieval bridge which is quite fascinating, particularly as most boats can't sail under it!

You may also be stopping in North Walsham (depending on which option you choose).  This was also an important weaving town in the 12th century.  It has a huge church and is actually the largest church in the UK.  The town also has a rather unusual octagonal market cross.

Drainage mills and windmills

Thurne windmillThurne Windmill

It’s staggering how many windmills and drainage mills you’ll come across during the Weavers Way long distance walk.  At one point, towards the end of the walk, I counted 7 all around me!   Some are working, others are well restored or being restored whilst others are left as derelict ruins.   It's actually quite fun to keep spotting them!

There are some lovely photo opportunities besides these windmills too, particularly at Thurne.  Thurne windmill is the only white windmill in the Norfolk Broads and is still working.

They played, and still play an important part in the Norfolk Broads.  Their purpose is to pump water from the marshes and meadows into the dykes or the main rivers.

Half a windmill!

The Norfolk Broads Rivers and Staithes

The first river you encounter is the River Bure which is just outside the grounds of Blickling Hall in the middle of rural countryside.  It flows all the way into RSPB Breydon Water which is your finishing point. 

However, you don’t follow this particular river all the way.  

A river bank

The path then takes you across country to the next river which is the River Thurne in the Broads landscape.  This river joins the River Bure further down, so you meet up with it again (!), and then you part company to eventually join the River Yare which again flows into Breydon Water, but at a different entry point from the River Bure.  

The second half of this walk is a perfect opportunity to see what the Norfolk Broads really looks and feels like on foot!  You'll enjoy the peace and quiet along the high banks of three different rivers, as well as walking along some very typical Norfolk Broads staithes.

Grazing meadows and reedbeds

At one point on the walk you’ll discover what it’s like to be completely remote in the middle of the Norfolk grazing meadows and marshland.  There really is no form of civilisation around you, but don’t worry, signage is good!

planks over dykes in the marshes

Weavers Way accommodation

Due to the nature of the Broads and the fact that it sometimes means huge detours to reach villages, some of the accommodation along this trail is a little sparse (again, like the Wherryman’s Way and Peddars Way) so transfers are needed on two of the options.  Many of the stops are in pubs because B&B’s unfortunately seem to be waning.  

The history of the Weavers Way

Bridge over the River Bure

I always think it's good to get an idea of how or why these particular trails exist.  

The name of the Weavers Way comes from the cloth industry that was very important around the 12th century in this area

Norfolk produced some very distinctive course wool fibre that was woven into cloth, and as mentioned above, Worstead gave its name to this high quality wool fabric.  You walk right through the village of Worstead.  Other historical important weaving towns (along the Weavers Way) were Aylsham, North Walsham, Dilham and Honing.


I really hope that you now have a very good idea of how enjoyable this walk will be. 

Personally, I absolutely adored it.  I just loved the contrast of walking through stately home parklands to then encounter disused railways and finally to be in amongst the windmills and drainage mills and the wilderness of the marshland and grazing meadows in the Norfolk Broads.

Please do give me a ring if you would like to book this Weaver's Way walking holiday.  Alternatively, you can fill out the booking form, use the enquiry form or email me (details below)!  I’ll look forward to giving you a really enjoyable and unforgettable walk.

OR

CONTACT DETAILS:

Suzy Watson
+44 (0)7765 668188
enquiries@norfolkwalkingholidays.com

Other Long Distance Walks